Skip to main content

About your Search

20131015
20131023
SHOW
News 15
( more )
STATION
MSNBC 41
MSNBCW 41
CSPAN 32
CSPAN2 29
ALJAZAM 28
CNN 17
CNNW 17
WHUT (Howard University Television) 12
FBC 8
KGO (ABC) 6
KQED (PBS) 6
WTTG 6
WJZ (CBS) 5
COM 4
KCSM (PBS) 4
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 292
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 293 (some duplicates have been removed)
characters to the civil rights narrative. it is a familiar story told in an unfamiliar way. it is a story of african-americans, african-americans who crossed the color line. to cross the color line meant in fact at the time these were called representative negros, this is what african-americans called themselves who did this, they cross the color line, did something people were not supposed to do, african-american lawyers came to court in an era where there are no black judges, and it your job is to convince a group of white americans in the year of jim crow to decide in favor of your clients, when the entire court room is a deeply prejudiced institution, these are americans who crossed the color line to speak to white people, and at the same time people thought that they were supposed to be representative negros which meant they were supposed to be white like the rest of african-americans. the book is about the demand, of black people who break through a barrier that hasn't been broken through in -- it be like the larger society, and the rest of the race. and they represent the rest of t
. it is a history of the civil rights movement as it began in montgomery, alabama, in december of 1955, spread it throughout the state, throughout the country. the perfect went around the world, almost every civil rights event that has occurred since 1955, to some degree, you can trace a great deal of it back to montgomery, alabama. so "bus ride to justice" gives you a real history of the civil rights movement and to a lesser degree that shows the role that fred gray played in the civil rights movement as it developed as it spread a round world. today, you read about the marches and the speeches and read about and see on television the demonstrations and all of those things, on spreading the word and motivating people to do things, lawyers have almost been completely forgotten about in the civil rights movement. you know about dr. king, you know about mrs. potts, beautiful song and as you came up today. rosa parks's attorney, who is he? nobody knows who they is. tell you something a little bit about who is fred gray and how in the world did i get involved in the civil rights movement. you have
how the civil rights movement is taught. you would think with mlk day, how many times do you hear "i have a dream" in january and february ? only three states get an eight. only three states get a b. 35 states get an f including the great state of california. that is reprehensible. the first thing we have to do is provide the tools so we have a dvd with six hours of impeccably researched history. we have a great companion book. and now we have to lobby the school district, state legislatures, to put african- american history where it alongside in the classroom. and not only is a separate course because most legislatures will not do that. i am talking about integrating the stories so that, let's say not only do we learn about george washington, we learn about the slave kerry washington. he ran away from mount vernon and fought for the british and then when the british lost, went to nova scotia with the free black community, the former black patriots and then when nova scotia did not work out, they went to sierra leone and settled there. that tells a former story of american history an
to that of medgar evers, the civil rights activist killed in 1960 three in mississippi. it took 30 years to bring his to justice. to talk more about the killing of alex odeh, we're joined by three guests. attorney albert mokhiber is a former president of the arab -- american arab anti- discrimination committee. is a civil rights attorney here in new york and helped found the adc and was vice chair of the committee at the time. he was also involved in a groundbreaking court case in the 1970s that forced the national security agency to it knowledge would've been spying on him since 1967. we will talk more about that in a moment. and we're staying with democratic congressmember don conyers of michigan, who is calling for an investigation. let's begin with albert mokhiber . 1985us back to october 11, . tell us exactly what you understand happened. routinely opened the office store that day, and it was a very sophisticated tripwire bomb. when he opened the door, he was blown to pieces. yearsunately, despite 28 of knocking on the doors of justice, we have not found it yet. alex was a very peaceful man.
multiof the civil rights era, watching your own countrymen and country women beat african-americans in the street and beat civil rights activists in the street, and watching on television the horrors of vietnam, you know, a war that lyndon johnson himself never wanted, that the american people never wanted. i mean, those two seminal events so enrage liberals, and understandably so, that they begin to question the basic fairness and decency of their own country. and i argue that american liberals in sum, not all, begin to have a more radical critique of american society than what franklin roosevelt had or john kennedy had. instead of, you know, piecemeal reform they, you know, today want more radical approaches to, um, to change america for the better. and, you know, and so when middle america feels that their country is being demeaned and attacked, and their own values are being demeaned and attacked by, well, the term is appropriate, liberal elites meaning, you know, upper middle class, educated, higher income liberals who take over the democratic party in the late '60s.
the classical stage -- after the classical era of the civil rights revolution. why? why does a for red actions start taking word? what pumps the rise of affirmative-action? our number of things that prompted it. one thing is that people saw that the hand of over to anti-black discrimination -- that was welcome, a good thing, a very good thing. but simply ceasing anti-black discrimination, that was scared. it was useful. open up opportunities for some black people. up in the public in is to my for instance, for black people who had developed the skills, gun education's so when these artificial race barriers, you know, were taken from them there were in a position to march right for. but that did not help so much the many millions of black people who have really been debilitated by jim crow segregation. what about black people who because of jim crow segregation did not get a good education or were deprived of opportunities? these people, even when the races barriers went down, so there are no races barriers in front of them. let's just about the size of for a moment. no race barriers, but becau
at the center of this complaint found with the maryland commission on civil rights. >> my other coworkers, they all had different color in their hair like red and blond highlights. i didn't think it would be an issue. >> reporter: johnson was fired from her job as a waitress at baltimore's harbor place hooters in august after managers told her her hair color violated employee image standards. >> they specifically said black women don't have blond in their hair so you need to take it out. >> what's wrong is that both federal and state law clearly say employers can't impose two separate and distinct rules governing employee standards. one for african-american employees and bun for everyone else. hats exactly what hooters did here. >> why don't we just not define hairstyles for anyone. >> reporter: baltimore delegate mary washington agrees employers need to be able to define personal appearance and grooming standards but is drafting legislation that would revent employers from requiring or prohibiting specific hairstyles. she says johnson is one of many examples. >> also there's some women a
to be killedas for civil-rights.wao of the people blamed the i was not for a -- dallas but for lee harvey oswald.rica o 70 policemen and a crowded sry basement that deprived america of the rest of the story.d. iv trial, and i choose todn't fg explain, people felt itoffials o never happened did they could not forget or forgive m for letting the most famous yams murder be murdered on live television with 70 people protecting him. >> host: who is still surviving war what happened?ctiv >> the major player have long died but today the noheast detective jim lapel he is still alive in his 90s. lee harvey oswald's widow is a life into his children.it. the of people are stille wtnes living by schieffer a and dan rather have greatre ale. stories there were severalb hundred witnesses that arery. still alive people that new ther laws called some of them heard the rifle shots --y. even the governor connallyancily ladybird johnson, nydia of those ancillary participants are still alive if. >> host: newark new jersey ibnaud or the first call. go-ahead. >> caller: i am currentlyprojec an a high-school fast to do
inspired by the words of dr. martin luther king and i was actively involved in the civil rights movement. when the vietnam war started, i joined the anti-vietnam war movement. i became a member of the eipj - the entertainment industry for peace and justice and worked alongsid donald sutherland and jane fonda and in 1972, i became a mcgovern delegate to the democratic national convention in miami beach. in the 1970s when the movement began to get redress and an apology for that incarceration of japanese americans, i joined in with that as well. i testified at the congressional commission gathering information on the internment. i was involved in all the civil rights and social justice advocacy campaigns except for one issue that was organic to me. that was an immutable part of me from the time i was a young boy, i knew i was different in ways more than my asian face. the other boys would say, "monica is hot." [laughter] sally is cute. i thought monica and sally were nice -- [laughter] but bobby was exciting. [laughter] when ever he came near me or talked to me, my heart started to pound.
rights was cautious and defensive. civil rights act act was only proposed by kennedy in 1963, three years into his administration. a arthur sleginger says liberals were upset instead of pushing for civil rights and medicare, he was push being for these tariff cuts and free trade. when kennedy met with civil rights leaders after the march on washington, the first thing he said to them wasn't how can we work together and pass this law. he said, why can't you blacks be more like the jews and focus -- >> i love blacks and jews coming together -- >> we experience that every day. >> to be clear, you're not suggesting that the kennedy civil rights record was in the conservative part of the democratic party at the time? >> it was. in fact -- that he was more -- >> kennedy was endorsed in the 1960 campaign by some of these segregationist southern governors. >> you endorsed them. >> there were the -- the reason kennedy called coretta scott king during the 1960 campaign was that the black vote was up for grabs. there were lots of liberal -- the democrats used to be a southern conservative party dati
in their churches. they were lynched and murdered so we could have civil rights and voting rights in this nation. so my life changed. of episodes of crazy robin williams on tv, i had fewer beers, played less dominoes. the what changed and transformed for our family is being integrated. the next year after harold washington wins the general election, now mayor of the city of chicago, i decided to take on dan rutkowski. it was the only election i have lost. i still remember the night in 1984 in march when i got 24% of the vote. i remember saying to my wife, you know what? this is it, we will never do this again. i remember the radio saying, it is 7:00 and the polls have closed and a tear coming down my eye. it was happiness that i would not have to go out again. it is a very strong democratic party machine. all of my neighbors on my block had dan rutkowski. these are peoples whose karzai had helped start in the cold winters but sometimes shoulders snow goose children played with whose karzai had helped start in the cold winters, sometimes shoveled their snow, their children played with my daughter. al
and racially coded rhetoric. when president johnson signed the civil rights act of 1964, he said, quote, we've lost the south for a generation. it didn't take long for republicans to exploit that idea. notorious gop strategist lee atwater laid it out. how republicans could exploit racial views without being explicitly racist. >> you start out in 1954 by saying [ bleep ], by 1968 you can't say [ bleep ]. that hurts you, backfires. so you stay stuff like forced bussing, states rights and stuff like that. all that stuff you're talking about are totally economic things and blacks get had hurt worse than whites. >> republicans started using those to their advantage. running shameful ads specifically targeting those views. >> his revolving door prison policy gave weekend furloughs to murderers not for parole. one was willie horton who murdered a boy. you needed that job. and you were the best qualified, but they had to give it to a minority because of a racial quota. against racial quotas, jesse helms. >> this sort of resentment has been stoked by the right. we've heard for decades of talk about
be able to support it as a civil right, not so much as a religious right out a civil r-i-t-e. >> we are looking for a church home. we were unhappy where we were, at least one church told us that, well, this church doesn't really like homosexuality. we don't really believe in that. we just wanted a place of worship where we felt comfortable. >> as well as form who we are at black gay men, to be in a space where we didn't have to hide, worship god as well as being felt in a safe place. >> covenant baptist united church of christ is listed as a welcoming and affirming baptist congregation. it is not yet officially listed as ona but that's just a technicality. this church is definitely on the leading edge of the welcoming church movement. >> i often say in the beginning i used to whale at god, why us, god, why did you give us this ministry. but, i've gotten to a point where i thank god for choosing us to be pioneers. >> our goal is not to be a gay church. our goal is to be the church. >> it's not just the gay folk who appreciate what has been done here, often say this place saved my lif
some the issues she , got involved in? >> the first lady of the world. civil rights, she got very involved in getting african- americans more equal rights. working in west virginia with coal miners and the working people of america. the unforgotten and downtrodden people. also, which i'm sure we will talk about, women's issues. getting women into the forefront of american political life. she had no role model. she created there's nobody quite this role all on her own. there's nobody quite like her. >> but here she is in 1933 on the radio talking to women about their need to volunteer. are willing to do things because it is going to help their neighbors, i think we will win out. .ot because of the government not even because of our leaders, but because as a people we have went vision and we have for it and we have seen it through. >> allida, she spent a lot of time on the radio. >> she did. she had her own radio show. she will have become her own syndicated columnist in 1935 and 1936. by the end of her life, she will write over 8000 columns. more than 27 books. give 75 speeches a y
? >> i got that one. eleanor took controversial stance on the issues of civil rights, women working, women traveling unescorted. she spoke out by the second term a legal and constitutional questions that made people a little nervous. and especially the daughters of the american revolution who looked at her and called her an unfit woman and really did not want her in the white house. throughout numbers and the letters she received as well as the hate mail and the largest fbi file that we have in american history up until that time shows the extent to which the american public really revered her. but the people dislike her disliked her intensely. she really was -- for what you thought about democracy and social upheaval at the time. if it was good for the government to be engaged or for people who disagreed with each other, who do not look like each other to get the table, if you thought women should have a strong voice, you stood with eleanor roosevelt. if the things made you uncomfortable, you really did not. >> i agree with all of that. the fact that she did so much with african as
closed doors but pretend to be civil rights groups. we discovered a massive deception. it would be like david duke presenting himself as a civil rights organization and getting recognized by the white house and the media and congress. bill: back up some of these claims. take it one at a time. inspired by the muslim brotherhood they enjoy considerable influence in the united states, how and where? >> they operate under fake names or false names. they don't call themselves the muslim brotherhood. this was laid out in various documents or secret tape-recordings we portray in the film. the document that viewers just saw talked about their you will tear yeah agenda. so all of these groups and i'm not exaggerating to say that there are scores of radical islamic groups hiding under the pretension of being civil rights organization or a religious organization. but in fact have an ulterior agenda. the film itself portrays what goes on behind closed doors with these organizations. whether it's hamas, hezbollah, all of these groups have organizations in the u.s. and they portray themselves as simp
. the strategy is largely kept quiet but there have been hints. >> the great civil rights issue of our time and that is the need for every man, woman, and child to have healthcare is a right and not a privilege. >> i believe healthcare is a civil right. >> although healthcare was not listed per se in the constitution. it should be a constitutional right. >> you do have the right to have healthcare and to education and to decent housing. >> ms. perry's point of view is a socialist communist vision that the state should provide all citizens a certain lifestyle at the expense of other citizens. if healthcare is a constitutional right, then everything subordinated with good health would fall into the civil rights category. your entire environment, house, food, clothing, transportation, mental health would a paid for by the state. if you could not afford it that's a form of communism because no country could afford those payments without seizing the assets of everybody else. it's impossible. right now, the u.s.a. has a debt of $17 trillion and growing. some of that debt is because of wars. but m
the 1930s, the al capone gangster to the late 1960s, the entire vietnam war protests and civil rights movement iraqis home and said almost in a stage whisper and i wondered if he wanted me to hear this, don't let jamie read the newspapers. they lived with us. what did i do the moment i was alone? grab a copy of the chicago sun times to read the newspaper. how many of you remember the name richard speck? almost all of you. madman murdered a number of student nurses in chicago. i read all about it because my grandfather said don't let him read the newspaper. since that day i have read seven newspapers a day and four on weekends. i am addicted to newspapers and i'm sure it is because of my grandfather and grandmother exposing me to these when i was a little boy. my father went south to high school in chicago and the teachers used to point at a desk, he would tell me this, in that desk sat one of the eight nazi sabateurs who landed on american shores by you boat in 1942. of course he was executed. i told my agent i want to write about the nazi spies who into america. my father told me abo
. but when you refer to the democratic party being irresponsible and inhumane about civil rights, you're right. you're correct. but here it's a different situation. obama care is not civil rights and obama care, i submit, is going to harm the american people. it's bad for the folks. so therefore, you're basically saying, carl bernstein is saying, even though this law is going to hurt the majority of americans by making them pay more and the doctors are going to flee, it's going to be a mess, it's already a mess, let it go. let is go. don't challenge it. don't go after it. let it go. and i don't think that's right. >> that's not what i'm saying. i'm saying, you have a place to debate if you want it. >> obama care. that's the big one. >> well, as was social security which was opposed by republicans in the '30s. >> and now we have data it isn't working. >> that's right. it's eventually become overwhelmed by the trust fund. >> listen, do you think obama care is going to work and do you think it's a good thing? >> i think it's a first step like romney care to do something about a broken he
remember -- i was born and 53. i was 10 years before the civil rights act. chicago was a segregated city. the police are hostile to us. they want there to serve and protect. they were much but likely to picture up against ron ask you what you are doing. you are always a suspect in your own neighborhood, number one. but moreover, their beaches and swimming pools in schools and neighborhoods that are inaccessible to you because they were for whites only. so i just want to warn people that have been going to puerto rico brought a sudden i'm not puerto rican anymore. >> host: to understand your point of view, we have see her childhood growing up in puerto rican linkin park. and then when you're 15, you're dead toasty sun, we are puerto rico. this is what she said about it i think now moving wasn't a choice for my dad. it was an obligation. were my parents sick of english-language? who is the gang sunrise. it was time to go to puerto rico. so you're just what you're going to puerto rico at 16. you leaving your friends, everything you knew and go to a place you've heard about. but she were bor
will argue to uphold the ban against the coalition to defend affirmative action. the civil rights activists group who will argue against it. >> i really feel a responsibility. >> kevin gain as professor of history and african-american studies at the university of michigan is among many names in the suit opposed to proposal 2. >> it is a very lonely position to have to feel that you have to fight battles that you had thought had been fought, and won. years ago. >> since proposal 2 took effect, the number of black and latino students entering the state's public universities has dropped by a third. professor gains believed the ban on affirmative action is blocking out diversity. >> there's a misconception out there, that race con, admissions is all about admitting someone based on the color of their skin and nothing else, and nothing could be phut fresh the truth. >> but proposal disagree, among them is jennifer great whose in 1997, was denied admission to the university of michigan and claimed she was the victim of discrimination. >> i believe in equality, i believe that people should be trea
americans are white, and some civil rights laws are taking a pummeling in the poll. close to 60% support ending affirmative action in hiring and education. 63% believe request for minority rights has gone so far that it is harming the majority. 54% oppose path to citizenship for undocumented workers. it seems for the majority of the centrists they don't see civil rights as much of a problem, jim? >> no, it's a mishmash, isn't it. i think you alluded to it before, a lot of them tend to be pro same-sex marriage, pro abortion, heavily white, distinctly secular. i can't remember the exact numbers, something like 30% may be even attend church services. that's a significant change and telling about their world-view. and yes, i think there's a kind of very self-possessed sel self-absorbed under current for a lot of them. i got to where i am because of what i achieved. why should those liberal courts be helping others up. that's an issue that is going to take a lot of the supreme court's time this term as they rule on a really important university of michigan affirmative action case which concei
of the students are suing a school district. the principal and assistant principal saying their civil rights were violated. >> state regulators is he set to vote on a ground breaking requiring utilities to invest in energy storage. once they can be stored the grid can make better use of solar and wind power to again rate energy this, could jump start tech molg considered crucial to electricity industry, expected to spur innovation from batteries to wheels. >> speaking of electricity usage for lights on the bay bridge about to go up starting november 1, the light show which is really magnificent will shine from sunset until sun rise. now right now end agent 2:00 a.m. >> coming up next how often women you really love, what would you do?" ♪ [ woman ] i'd be a writer. [ man ] i'd be a baker. [ woman ] i wanna be a pie maker. [ man ] i wanna be a pilot. [ woman ] i'd be an architect. what if i told you someone could pay you and what if that person were you? ♪ when you think about it, isn't that what retirement should be, paying ourselves to do what we love? ♪ to those who've encountered welcome
borders, you protect our civil rights, you help our businesses grow, you gain foot holds in overseas markets, you protect the air we breathe and the water our children drink. you push the boundaries of science and space. you have hundreds of thousands of people each day through the glories of this country. thank you. what you do is important. don't let anybody else tell you differently. especially the young people who come to this city to serve. believe that it matters. you know what? you're right, it does. those of us who have the privilege to serve this country have an obligation to do our job as best we can. we come from different parties, but we are americans first, and that's why disagreement cannot mean dysfunction. it can't degenerate into hatred. the american people's hopes and dreams are what matters, not ours. our obligations are to them. our regard for them compels us all, democrats and republicans, to cooperate. and compromise. and act in the best interests of our nation. one nation. under god, indivisible, for liberty and justice for all. thanks very much. >> you've been
the unified school district and the principal involved claiming their sons' civil rights were violated. in missouri charges and a controversy rape case could be refiled as the prosecution dropped the charges after a judge was asked to look again. after learning the rape charges could be refiled over the man who raped her when she was 14. she believes the charges were dropped because her attacker is related to a former state legislator. the prosecutor says they were dropped because the victim refused to cooperate. the prosecutor will now ask the judge to appoint a special prosecutor to look over the facts of the case and determine whether the charges should be refiled. >> a colorado man is recovering this morning after surviving a vicious attack by non-one -- by not one but these coyotes, with too many bites and scratches to count while working to work after the car breakdown. he says that the coyotes came charging from the darkness. he stood his ground and fought back. >> i took my flashlight and 900 the side of the head to let go and then another lunged at me and all i thought to do w
. martin luther king and i was actively involved in the civil rights movement. when the vietnam war started, i joined the anti-vietnam war movement. i became a member of the eipj - the entertainment industry for peace and justice and worked alongsid donald sutherland and jane fonda and in 1972, i became a mcgovern delegate to the democratic national convention in miami beach. in the 1970s when the movement began to get redress and an apology for that incarceration of japanese americans, i joined in with that as well. i testified at the congressional commission gathering information on the internment. i was involved in all the civil rights and social justice advocacy campaigns except for one issue that was organic to me. that was an immutable part of me from the time i was a young boy, i knew i was different in ways more than my asian face. the other boys would say," monica is hot." [laughter] sally is cute. i thought monica and sally were nice -- [laughter] but bobby was exciting. [laughter] when ever he came near me or talked to me, my heart started to pound. the other guys did not feel th
of the president's new deal policy and causes like education, a living wage, and civil rights. as first lady, she held regular press conferences and invited only women reporters to cover them and she was the first first lady to travel overseas without the president. the first to address a national political convention, and the first to write her own daily syndicated column. join us for a two-hour program as we explore the life and legacy of eleanor roosevelt on first ladies, influence and image next monday, live it 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span, c-span3, and c-span radio. we are offering a special edition of the book, "first ladies of the united states of america," presenting a biography and portraits of the first ladies. it is available for the discounted price of 1295 -- $12.95. our website has more about the first ladies including a special section, welcome to the white house. produced by our harner. -- parter. cycling life in the mansion during the first tenure of the first ladies. >> tonight, speakers from annual techcrunch conference in san francisco. first, the death the yahoo! president. fo
i veteran of the civil rights movement, did not know. so when people hear that it's derogatory, they wonder, are they saying i'm a racist? and since i'm not, i -- i go into denial. therefore i deny that this name is derogatory. but if we have a fencef to advocate people about why it's derogatory, and to make them understand that it is not for us to decide what is derogatory. it is for those who receive it. >> understood, but congresswoman, as larry pointed out, native-americans have real problems. in fact, listen to what one virginia tribal chief had to say about president obama's support to change the name. take a listen. >> why would my president say that's offensive to me? what's offensive to me is this? we have 11 state recognized tribes, and he hasn't done one thing to get thor tribes federally recognized. >> what are you doing for the native-americans that you care about, to eradicate a lot of the other issues that are weighing on their minds. not doing to them -- >> no, i asked you the question. >> i am going to answer it. this has nothing to do with the congress of the
cruise and i'm trying to bring more gay marriage things around. civil rights is not political. it's so close to my heart and important. a lot of work left to be done. >> were you upset about the government shutdown? >> yes. any other job in america, you can't just not show up. you get fired and you have to figure outsomething else. ifou are in the government -- i'm ashamed of everyone right now. it's embarrassing. i was just overseas in france for a thing for pivot and it's embarrassing to have your government shut down. >> if you were to live anywhere other than america where -- >> i love america. i'm not leaving. i don't entertain that. i was in france five days and so ready to come home. i love this country, would never leave it. >> you and governor christie in jersey got into it a bit. >> can you believe that. he's your governor. do you like hi >> i like him for what he did galvanizing the state for hurricane sandy. he did a great job in bullying washington and making sure we got the money. i mean the state is not all cleaned up, but he cares about his state. do i like him outside
years after the march in washington for civil rights, and 150 years after slavery, it may be time for "12 years of a slave" to talk about the relations. >> and it is about remembering and never forgetting and understanding the past and embracing the past, and go forward into the future. >> i think that it speaks to the ongoing need for human respect simply. to see people as they are, and see people as individuals. it leads us down the road towards recognizing human dignity which inexorably leads us down the road to understanding the importance of peace. >> that is a lot to hope for from a movie, but it forces the viewers to really see a history that many would rather forget, "12 years of slave" could stir the conversation. for "religion & ethics newsweekly," i'm debra potter in washington. >> and now a lucky severson story about thailand and a lawyer who is teaching students all over southeast asia that they have a responsibility to help the poor, and then training them to do just that, at least for sex workers. >> this is a cross gendered cabaret in thailand and the workers here
is challenging. >> a group of civil rights advocates. >> civil rights people who want. >> defend o. firmive action. >> how many states right now have no affirmative action in, say, universities in hiring? do we know? >> california just the ninth circuit said the referendum that the california passed banning affirmative action was okay. so the reason the supreme court took this is because now. >> i'm just wondering how many states have this kind of stuff. we don't know? we'll find out. >> this is a ripe issue that they have tried to not. >> i'm agreeing. >> the supreme court is going it uphold no affirmative statements in action that states voted it out. >> the voters voted for this it. >> a big states rights issue. >> this is in colorado. we predicted this would happen here. the left wing press went wild. more and more school districts are saying that if you are a transgendered person, you know, they are not subjective. you you don't have to prove that you can two and use any bathroom you want. any locker room you want. >> right. >> what's happening, guilfoyle in colorado. >> challenging si
continued their struggle, through the jim crow years and the years of the civil rights movement, inspired by dr. king's eloquence, today we have an african-american in that big white house on pennsylvania avenue. and they are all change agents. we are a nation of change agents. and that's why i am optimistic about our future. but, i still have a continuing ever present fear. i fear that big white building with the dome on it at the far end of pennsylvania avenue. we still have january 15 and february 7. be afraid, america. be afraid. thank you very much. [applause] [applause] [applause] >> thank you. we have a lot of questions on a lot of topics. we will try to cover a little ground in a bunch of areas. this questionnaire asks -- you talked about the work yet to be done in terms of gay marriage being legal in all states. what do you see as the next civil rights fight on the horizon after gay marriage? >> we still have a long ways to go. as long as there are young people bullied and made to feel very inferior, as long as young people get kicked out of their homes when they come out as ga
mclaughlin, both longtime civil rights attorneys who also represented the family of kenneth chamberlain, a white plains, new york marine veteran who was shot dead by police in 2011 in his home after he accidentally set off his medical alert pendant early in the morning. we invited representatives from both the new york city a new rochelle police department's to join us today. we welcome you all to democracy now! randolph mcglockton, can you just give us a summary of the case of mohammed bah? >> his mother called 911, hoping to get an ambulance to come and take her son of the hospital. sheofficers arrived and explained to them, i did not call the police, i wanted to name the lives. they explained to her the way it works in new york is weak come first and check on the situation and then we will get the ambulance. she and the two officers went upstairs to the fifth floor and the apartment building and the officers knocked on his door. mr. bah open the door. when he sell the officers he said, i didn't call you commies got the wrong door. they tried to shut the door. instead they forced thei
with the maryland commission on civil rights. >> my other co-workers all had different colors in their hair like red and blonde highlights. i didn't think it would be an issue. >> reporter: johnson was fired from her job as a waitress at baltimore's harborplace hooters in august after managers told her her hair color violated employee image standards. >> they specifically said black women don't have blonde in their hair so you need to take it out. >> reporter: jessica webber is her attorney. >> what is wrong is federal and state law clearly say that employers can't include two separate and distinct rules governing employee standards, one for african-americans and one for everyone else. that is exactly what hooters did here. >> why don't we just not define hairstyles for anyone? >> reporter: baltimore delegate mary washington agrees employers need to be able to define personal appearance and grooming standards but she's already drafting legislation that would prevent employers from requiring or prohibiting specific hairstyles. she says johnson is just one of many examples. >> also there's some women
civil rights complaint against uconn, to the university and to the u.s. department of education. as you can see, sitting with them, gloria allred, she is representing them. she says what these women experienced is a violation of the federal title 9 law. she is calling for a formal investigation into that university. uconn says it takes allegationses of sexual assault extremely serious. >>> a couple boy scout leaders have been kicked out after they posted this video on youtube. >> wiggle it just a little bit. >> oh my goodness. >> dudes, you should have known better than that. we first showed you the video last week. video taping themselves, toppling a sand stone formation over in utah. well, turns out those rocks have been around a million years, maybe more, so they found it funny. the folks interested in preserving the park did not last at all and now the boy scout leaders have been stripped of their leadership positions within the scouts. >> really we're in the business of building character in boys and when we are out there trying to do that, being an example and setting a good e
get there. i think that showed undaunting and fierce courage. >> that and civil rights. we had a wonderful call a minute ago of her going to georgia and sitting next to two african-americans and that kind of setting and how backwards we were on race relations in america, '30s and '40s. her voice on a national level and started bursting through. she has the place of honor in the civil rights movement. she cared about equality. >> finally, on our website, c-span.org/first ladies, we have a companion book available for this series. alita black worked hard on that book. and it's available to you as well, at cost. we're not making any money off of it. if you like to see it, it profiles all the first ladies to michelle obama. alita black worked on that. we like to thank our partners in this series, the white house historical association for their work for us in getting everything together for the programs. next week, it's bess truman. going to leave you this week with a little bit of eleanor roosevelt from 1953 talking about what it means in her view to be a liberal, we thank doug br
's civil rights program. more than 6,000 flock to the convention to select a presidential ticket. >> 65 years ago, southerners left the democratic party in droves over the embrace of the civil rights plank to hold their own convention where they nominated a rival presidential ticket for the 1948 election. nominee was none other than strom thurmond, who is not always remembered as a former democrat, as a dixiecrat, but he should be. we think of the democrats and republicans as ageless eternal entities, and they have been the two major parties in this country for 150 years now. about the only thing either party kept for all that time is its name. once upon a time, no region more in love with the democratic party than the south. the white house segregationist south. this through a series of dramatic events in the middle of the 20th century when harry truman integrated the military, northern democrats pushed through that civil rights plank in 1948, when lbj signed the civil rights act in 1964, through those events that the white house south split off from the party. that series of events al
and just like fire everybody. >> so civil service rules then. >> all right, by the way, unlike the "wall street journal" if you want to get through call 1-800-318-2596. you'll get an agent. ronan farrow, thank you very much. >> mika makes things happen. >> she could be making it up. >> i'm just saying i guess somebody had a bad experience but i got through. i'll try again. >> we're excited you're here. >> we have cool ideas for the show. it's got to pass mustard with this crowd. >> we'll love you. when is the show going to start? >> january. stay tuned. >> legal in new jersey and the "daily show" noticed just how excited senator-elect cory booker was about it. helicopthierhis hibuzzing, andk engine humming. sfx: birds chirping sfx: birds chirping [ male announcer ] welcome back all the sweet things your family loves with 0-calorie monk fruit in the raw. ♪ welcome back [ male announcer ] it's made with the natural, vine-ripened sweetness of fruit, so you can serve up deliciously sweet treats without all the sugar. so let no drink go unsweetened. no spatula un-licked. and no last bit un
is a graduate of new york university school of law. at heritage, he focuses on civil rights, the role of the federal court, and other constitutional issues. each panelist will speak for 10 minutes. then we will have a conversation with you, the audience. >> thank you very much. and thank you, representative bishop, for being in leadership on this important issue. one of the important things the shutdown has shown is the importance of memorials and how americans care about them. they are sacred. i started with the image of dwight eisenhower in normandy in 1963. this is normandy today. the cemeteries are shutdown. the flag does not fly. it is really a denigration of our memory -- a desecration of our memory and the brave souls who parish to in normandy. -- who perished in normandy. there are not many presidential memorials. most presidents go home and die. i have simple memorials. but we have a tradition, starting with the great obelisk of the washington memorial, moving on to the lincoln memorial, and then to the jefferson memorial. these memorials, jefferson and lincoln are 20th centu
. >> okay. >> that's the sequence of events. >> who is challenging. >> a group of civil rights advocates. >> civil rights people who want. >> defend o. firmive action. >> how many states right now have no affirmative action in, say, universities in hiring? do we know? >> california just the ninth circuit said the referendum that the california passed banning affirmative action was okay. so the reason the supreme court took this is now. >> i'm just wondering how many states have this kind of stuff. we don't know? we'll find out. >> this is a ripe issue that they have tried to not. >> i'm agreeing. >> the supreme court is going it uphold no affirmative statements in action that states voted it out. >> the voters voted for this it. >> a big states rights issue. >> this is in colorado. we predicted this would happen here. the left wing press went wild. more and more school districts are saying that if you are a transgendered person, you know, they are not subjective. you you don't have to prove that you can two and use any bathroom you want. any locker room you want. >> right. >> what's happ
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 293 (some duplicates have been removed)